Volume V, No. 1 Editor-in-Chief Remarks

Dear Readers:

The Editorial Board and Staff of the University of Baltimore Journal of International Law have worked diligently to ensure Volume V provides our readers with pieces that are both informative and insightful. This is the first of two publications by the staff for this year. This issue features articles by leading scholars as well as a Student Comment and three Emerging Issues by members of our Journal.

This issue begins with an article by Isabel Mota Borges, The Responsibility of Transnational Corporations in the Realization of Children’s Rights. In this article, Ms. Borges examines the impact and responsibility of transnational corporations to ensure protection and fulfillment of children’s rights. Following this article is piece written by Michael Livingston. In his comparative study, Reparation, Restoration, Incarceration: Comparative Perspectives on the African-American Reparations Problem, Mr. Livingston highlights two different viewpoints concerning the reparations issue. In our last article, Semantic Reversal: Individual, Person, Individualism, Individualization, and Subject of Fundamental Rights, author Brunela Vieira De Vincenzi discusses alternate means of dispute resolution on a global scale.

Our Student Comment in this issue is from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. candidate, Aviana Cooper. Ms. Cooper’s comment, Syrian Refugees- Economic Benefit or Substantial Burden on States of the European Union, discusses the current status of the Syrian refugee crisis related to the European Union. Our Emerging Issues are from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidates Madison Kyger, Zahra Lanewala and Margie Beltran. Ms. Kyger’s piece focuses on global equality of transgender citizens while Ms. Lanewala’s editorial reviews reintegration of unaccompanied minors. Finally, Ms. Beltran gives an overview of recent Polish media legislation.

The aforementioned articles along with additional commentary and previous publications from the Journal of International Law can be found here and on the University of Baltimore’s ScholarWorks page, http://scholarworks.law.ubalt.edu/ubjil/.

In conclusion, I would like to thank the Editorial Board and Staff of the Journal for their significant contributions to this issue. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Nienke Grossman, faculty adviser to the Journal, for her direction, mentorship, and assistance throughout the school year. In addition, I must thank the Professors and staff of the University of Baltimore School of Law International Department and the Center for International and Comparative Law for their guidance and insight. Also, on behalf of the Journal, I would like to thank Dean Ronald Weich, the administration, and the Professors and Staff for their continuing support of our Journal. Finally, thank you, the reader, for your support and we hope you enjoy this issue.

It is with great pleasure we present the first issue of Volume V of The University of Baltimore Journal of International Law.

Sincerely,

Catherine B. Stitely

Editor-in-Chief

University of Baltimore Journal of International Law

Volume V

 

 

 

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Volume IV Issue II Editor in Chief Remarks

Dear Readers,

The Editorial Board and Staff of the University of Baltimore Journal of International Law have worked diligently to ensure the second and final issue of Volume 4 provides our readers with pieces that are both compelling and significant. The superior works published in this edition reflect the Journal’s ongoing expansion and increasing ability to bridge together our community with an exceptional global network of talented lawyers, professors, and practitioners.

Last spring the University of Baltimore Center for International and Comparative Law hosted the Conselho Nacional de Pesquisa e Pós-Graduação em Direito (CONPEDI). This group of Brazilian scholars discussed “The International Protection of Human Rights as seen from Brazil and the U.S.A.” With the help of Professor Marcelo Galuppo, the Journal coordinated with three Brazilian scholars to publish their works in this Issue.

The Issue begins with a piece by Thaís Vandresen and Maria Cláudia S. Antunes de Souza. Their article, Globalization, Global Governance and Challenges to Contemporary Constitutionalism: the (trans) Constitutional Perspective and the Dialogue Among Jurisdictions, discusses the challenges facing contemporary constitutionalism. This article is followed by Jose Sampaio and Beatriz Costa’s article, The Role of Brazil and United States in the International Promotion of the Right to a Healthy Environment. In this article the authors examine the role Brazil and the United States play in protecting the right to a healthy environment. Ricardo Gueiros Bernardes Dias writes our final article. His article, A Comparative Empirical Study of Negotiation in Criminal Proceedings Between Brazil and the United States of America, reflects the findings of a first-hand investigation that he conducted in Brazil and the United States on the mechanisms for truth in criminal negotiations.

Our Student Comment in this Issue is from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidate, Margery R. Beltran. Ms. Beltran’s comment, Not Really a Battle of the Sexes: Women’s Health Agenda Advocates Global Equality in Medical Research Trials and Drug Administration, advocates for a global healthcare system in which men and women are treated as biologically different, but socially and psychologically equal. Our Emerging Issues are from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidates, Aviana Cooper and Iram Ashraf. Ms. Cooper’s piece discusses the lawsuit filed by TransCanada against the United States over the Cancellation of Keystone XL Pipeline Project. Ms. Ashraf’s article focuses on the humanitarian issues surrounding the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar.

The aforementioned articles along with additional commentary and previous publications from the Journal of International Law can be found here and on the University of Baltimore’s ScholarWorks page, http://scholarworks.law.ubalt.edu/ubjil/.

Finally, I would like to thank those who served on the Journal’s Staff and Editorial Board. Without your support, commitment, and dedication we would not be able to produce consistent high quality publications. In addition, I would like to thank our advisor, Professor Mortimer Sellers, for his incredible guidance, faith, and mentorship. Also, on behalf of the Journal, I extend our greatest thanks to Dean Ronald Weich and the University of Baltimore School of Law for recognizing and encouraging the talent embodied in the University of Baltimore Law students, faculty, and staff and for continuing to support this remarkable group. Finally, thank you, the reader, for your support and we hope you enjoy this Issue.

We anticipate the second Issue of Volume 4 of The University of Baltimore Journal of International Law to be available later this month.

Sincerely,

Christopher P. Stock

Editor-in-Chief

University of Baltimore Journal of International Law

Volume IV 2015-2016

 

 

 

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Volume 4 Issue 1 Editor-in-Chief Remarks

The Editorial Board and Staff of the University of Baltimore Journal of International Law have worked diligently to ensure Volume 4 provides our readers with pieces that are both interesting and insightful.   This is the first of two publications by this Editorial Board and Staff. This issue features articles by leading scholars from around the world as well as a Comment and two Emerging Issues by members of our Journal.

This issue begins with an article by Dr. Mohamed Abdelaal, SJD, Holding the Executive Accountable in Egypt Impeachment: A Losing Case. In this article Dr. Abdelaal examines the impeachment mechanism in Egypt after the 2011 Revolution and the 2013 events and the removal of Presidents Hosni Mubarak and Mohamed Morsi. Following this article is a case study done by Irene Broekhuijse LLM, PhD and Nanneke Quik-Schuijt, LLM. In their piece, A Case Study: Law and Emotions Within the Kingdom of the Netherlands, the authors analyze the dispute settlement procedure and propose an alternative approach. Our last article, Potential Impacts on Individuals Caused by the Invasion of NGOs into International Politics, authors Zhao Li and Haibin Qi evaluate the role Non-Governmental Organizations play in international cooperation and globalization.

Our Student Comment in this issue is from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidate, Suzanne De Deyne. Ms. De Deyne’s comment, TTIP: A Free Trade Agreement That Strengthens the International Trade Environment and Enhances the Regulatory Powers of the WTO, discusses the relationship between the Transatlantic Trade Investment Partnership and the World Trade Organization. Our Emerging Issues are from University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidates Ruby Devine and Aviana Cooper. Ms. Devine’s piece focuses on the Greek debt crisis, while Ms. Cooper’s editorial reviews China’s occupation of the South China Sea.

Finally, I would like to thank the Editorial Board and Staff of the Journal for their significant contributions to this issue. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Mortimer Sellers, faculty adviser to the Journal for his direction and assistance throughout the school year. In addition, I must thank the Professors and staff in the University of Baltimore School of Law International Department and the Center for International and Comparative Law for their insight. Last, but certainly not least, I would like to thank Dean Ronald Weich, the administration, and the Professors and Staff for their support of our Journal.

It is with great pleasure we present the first issue of Volume 4 of The University of Baltimore Journal of International Law.

Christopher P. Stock

Editor-in-Chief

University of Baltimore Journal of International Law

Volume IV

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Volume 3 Issue 2 Editor-in-Chief Remarks

I am pleased to welcome you to the second and final issue of Volume Three of The University of Baltimore Journal of International Law. Serving as the Editor-in-Chief of this Journal has been a distinct honor and privilege, and the staff and faculty advisers have been integral in making this publication possible. I would like to thank the Journal members for their tireless work throughout this volume, and for making it a true pleasure to serve as the Editor-in-Chief.

This issue begins with a piece from George Langendorf, an international attorney with extensive experience in South African law. Mr. Langendorf’s piece reviews the generally accepted roadmap for reducing corruption in government, and why South Africa’s implementation of the road-map has been unsuccessful. Following is an article by Veronica Pastor, Associate General Counsel at the global company, K2M. Ms. Pastor’s article addresses the policies of Bo Xilal, his eventual fall from political power, and the possible effects on future policy and politics in China. Next is a book review by Professor Alberto Cadoppi, University of Parma, reviewing The Birth of American Law: An Italian Philosopher and the American Revolution, by University of Baltimore School of Law Professor John Bessler. The Birth of American Law addresses the impact of the philosophies and writings of Cesare Beccaria on the founders and leaders of the American Revolution. Our student comment in this issue is from Laurie Culkin, University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidate. Ms. Culkin’s piece reviews the United States’ T-Visa program, and how the requirements might actually be hindering the goals of the United Nations’ Palermo Protocol. Finally, our Emerging Issues are from Carissa Hatfield and Alexandra Rickart, University of Baltimore School of Law J.D. Candidates. Ms. Hatfield’s Emerging Issue is a case-study of recent reproductive rights battles in El Salvador. Ms. Rickart’s Emerging Issue reviews the requirements for statehood under the Montevideo Convention on the rights and duties of states, and how those requirements apply in a modern world.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Professor Mortimer Sellers, faculty adviser to the Journal for his direction and assistance throughout the school year. I also must thank the professors and staff in the University of Baltimore School of Law International Department and the Center for International and Comparative Law for their input and for serving as advisers to our staff editor comments. Finally, thank you to Dean Ronald Weich for supporting our Journal, and for providing input and direction for the success of our Journal, students, and the University of Baltimore School of Law as a whole. It has been truly a pleasure serving this journal, and I hope you enjoy the final issue of Volume Three.

Sincerely,

Justin Tepe

Editor-in-Chief, Volume III

University of Baltimore Journal of International Law

University of Baltimore School of Law Journal of International Law, Volume III Issue II

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UNIVERSITY OF BALTIMORE JOURNAL OF INTERNATIONAL LAW SYMPOSIUM

On November 5, 2015 the University of Baltimore Journal of International Law held a symposium examining the current state of international trade.  Our panelists, Alexander Koff, a partner at Whiteford Tayor & Preston; Christine McDaniel, a Senior Economist at Sidley Alston, LLP; Gaurav Nayyar, an economist at the World Bank; John Gilliland, a consultant at Akin Gump; and our keynote speaker Angela Ellard, the Chief Trade Counsel and Trade Subcommittee Staff Director, Ways and Means Committee, U.S. House of Representatives all provided tremendous insight into this fascinating subject.

The landscape of international trade and development is changing rapidly, with multiple trade-agreement negotiations under way throughout the world. Through these agreements, the United States and its trading partners seek to encourage modernization, economic growth and job creation.

The U.S. is currently a party to the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which engages Pacific-rim countries in an agreement to lower trade barriers and to establish an investor-state dispute settlement mechanism. The U.S. also is working with the European Union on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP), which aims to promote multilateral economic growth. Most recently, in June, Congress passed the Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) – also known as fast-track negotiating authority — which gives enhanced power to the president regarding negotiations on major trade agreements with Asia and Europe.

The Journal would like to extend our deepest gratitude to the panelists and the University of Baltimore School of Law faculty and staff for their support of our journal

To watch a recording of the panel discussion, please click the link below:

2015 Journal of International Law Symposium

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The Journal of International Law’s Second Annual Symposium

On March 2, 2015 from 12:00-2:00 p.m., the University of Baltimore Journal of International Law will host its second annual symposium, International Human Rights: What is the U.S. Role? The symposium will be held on the 12th floor of the University of Baltimore, John and Frances Angelos Law Center.

Keynote address will be given by U.S. Senator Benjamin Cardin (D-MD). Senator Cardin will discuss his involvement in the Global Human Rights Accountability Act, and its current status in Congressional Committee.

Senator Cardin will be followed by a panel exploring the nexus of international human rights law and United States law and policy.

Please RSVP at http://www.ubalt.edu/calendar/EventDetail.cfm?eventId=13794&daterequest=3/2/2015&catid=8
Lunch will be provided.

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